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conservation chatter corner

with ron schroder

************************************************

YOUR IN ON THE OUTDOORS FOR WESTERN NEW YORK
www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com

3 - 22 – 19

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

DEC ANNOUNCES 2018 BEAR HARVEST RESULTS:

New York State bear hunters took 1,295 black bears during the 2018 hunting seasons.

Hunters took an estimated 804 black bears in New York's Southern Zone in 2018, about 20 percent fewer than 2017 and the recent five-year average. With reduced natural forage for bears this past fall and deep snows in mid-November prior to the regular firearms season, many bears went into dens a few weeks earlier than normal. As a result, although bear take through the early season and bow season was comparable to 2017, take during the regular season declined by more than 40 percent from 2017.

Similarly, hunters took about 45 percent fewer bears during the Northern Zone regular season in 2018 than they did in 2017. However, bear take during the early season was particularly strong, with nearly a three-fold increase over 2017 and 50 percent increase over the five-year average. Thus, in total, hunters took an estimated 491 bears in the Northern Zone, about 25 percent more than 2017 and on par with the historical average.

Bear Harvest by Zone:

                                          2018                    2017                    Average (2013-2017)

Northern Zone                 491                      383                      476

Southern Zone              804                      1,037                   1,056

Statewide                        1,295                   1,420                   1,532

Notable Numbers

One bear harvested per 3.2 square miles. By DEC Wildlife Management Unit (WMU), the greatest bear harvest density occurred in WMU 3C which mainly covers Ulster County and includes portions of Sullivan and Greene counties. The town of Kingston in Ulster County (WMU 3C) yielded one bear for every 1.5 square miles.

80: the greatest number of bears reported taken on any one day. It happened on November 17 - the opening day of the regular firearms season in the Southern Zone.

585 pounds: the heaviest dressed weight bear reported to DEC in 2018, taken in the town of Shandaken, Ulster County. A 550-pound dressed weight bear was reported taken in Marbletown, Ulster County, and six bears were reported with dressed weights between 400-500 pounds. Scaled weights of dressed bears were submitted for 23 percent of bears taken in 2018.

Six: the number of tagged bears reported in the 2018 harvest. These included one bear originally tagged in Pennsylvania and two from New Jersey. The remainder were originally tagged in New York for a variety of reasons, including research, nuisance response, relocated urban bears, or released rehabilitated bears.

767: the number of hunter-killed bears from which DEC collected teeth for age analysis in 2018. Hunters who reported their harvest and submitted a tooth for age analysis will receive a 2018 Black Bear Management Cooperator Patch. Results of the age analysis is expected to be available by September 2019.

Nine percent: the proportion of bears taken by non-resident hunters. Successful non-resident bear hunters hailed from 19 states, the farthest being Washington.

DEC's harvest estimates rely on successful hunters reporting their harvest. For more information on game harvest reporting, visit DEC's website.

2018 Bear Take Summary Report
A complete summary of the 2018 bear harvest with results and maps by county, town, and WMU is available on DEC's website.

 

PUBLIC INFORMATION SESSION ON HABITAT MANAGEMENT PLANS FOR JOHN WHITE AND OAK ORCHARD WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREAS:  The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will host a public information session to provide information and answer questions about recently completed habitat management plans for John White Wildlife Management Area (WMA), located in the town of Alabama, Genesee County, and Oak Orchard WMA, located in the towns of Alabama and Oakfield, Genesee County, and the towns of Barre and Shelby, Orleans County.

The session will take place on Wednesday, March 27, from 6:30 to 8 p.m, at the Town of Alabama Fire Department (Station 1), 2230 Judge Road, in the hamlet of South Alabama. The session will begin with an informal open house from 6:30 to 7 p.m., with DEC staff available for discussion. A formal presentation will begin at 7 p.m.

The fire department is wheelchair accessible. Please contact DEC Biologist Michael Palermo at (585) 226-5383 with any specific requests for accommodations.

John White WMA consists of 329 acres that are primarily grassland. Large grasslands are a relatively scarce habitat type in Western New York, and the grasslands on the WMA are important to several species, including bobolinks, grasshopper sparrows, horned larks, northern harriers, and short-eared owls.

Oak Orchard WMA consists of 2,554 acres that are primarily wetland. Wetlands on the WMA are extensive and diverse, composed of emergent marsh, scrub-shrub swamp, and forested wetlands. Some large grassland fields also occur on this WMA.

Habitat management goals for both WMAs are to maintain a diversity of wetland and upland habitats that benefit a wide range of resident and migrating wildlife species, including several rare and declining species. DEC will continue to actively manage these WMAs to benefit wildlife, while using best management practices. Planned management activities include: (1) timber harvests to improve forest health; (2) manipulation of water-levels in wetland impoundments; (3) mowing and replanting of grassland fields; and (4) control of invasive plant species.

The meeting will include a presentation about the history of management on these WMAs, specific activities and locations for the planned management actions, an overview of forest habitat management, and a question and answer period.

The habitat management plan for John White WMA can be found on DEC's website. The habitat management plan for Oak Orchard WMA can also be found on DEC's website. For more information about this event please call (585) 226-5383.

 

2019-2020 FRESHWATER FISHING DIGEST NOW AVAILABLE:

2019 Freshwater Fishing Regulations GuidePick up your copy of the 2019-20 Freshwater Fishing Digest at any license sales vendor.The new guide provides some great information for anyone interested in getting more involved in the sport of fishing, particularly women. The online version will be available April 1.

 

 

PENNSYLVANIA DEER HARVEST REPORT: Pennsylvania hunters posted their highest overall deer harvest in 14 years taking 374,690 deer during the state’s 2018-19 hunting season.

The 2018-19 deer harvest topped the previous year’s harvest of 367,159 by about 10 percent. The last time the total deer harvest exceeded this season’s total was in 2004-05.

After four years of successive annual increases in buck harvests, hunters posted a buck harvest of 147,750, which placed fourth overall since the start of antler restrictions in 2002. The 2018-19 buck harvest represents a 10 percent decline from the 2017-18 buck harvest of 163,750. The largest harvest in the antler-restrictions era – 165,416 – occurred in the first year.

Although the total deer harvest was not impacted by downpours on the opening day of the firearms deer season, the buck harvest seemed to take a hit. About half of the firearms season’s overall buck harvest typically occurs on the season’s opening day, when hunter participation is usually at its highest.

Steady rain in most of the state persisted through the morning if not longer of the firearms season opener, making hunting for deer, as well as staying dry and warm while afield, more difficult. And when hunter participation drops on the best harvest day of any season, the harvest typically does, too.

The 2018-19 overall antlerless deer harvest was 226,940, which is about 10 percent larger than the 2017-18 harvest of 203,409.

The percentage of older bucks in the 2018-19 deer harvest remained amazingly high. About 64 percent of the bucks taken by hunters were at least 2½ years old. The remainder were 1½ years old.

About 66 percent of the antlerless deer harvest was adult females; button-bucks comprised 17 percent and doe fawns made up 17 percent.

Bowhunters accounted for about a third of Pennsylvania’s 2018-19 overall deer harvest, taking 110,719 deer (54,350 bucks and 56,369 antlerless deer) with either bows or crossbows. But the buck harvest also was down in the 2018-19 archery seasons, by 13 percent. The previous license year, bowhunters took 62,830 bucks. Unseasonably warm weather and rain impacted many fall bowhunting days in 2018.

The muzzleloader harvest – 23,909 – was similar to the previous year’s harvest of 23,490. The 2018-19 muzzleloader harvest included 1,290 antlered bucks compared to 1,310 bucks in the 2017-18 seasons.

For additional information on Pennsylvania’s 2018-19 deer harvest, please go to the agency’s website – www.pgc.pa.gov – and go to the “White-Tailed Deer” page, then select 2018-19 Deer Harvest Estimates.

 

PREPARING NEST BOXES FOR SPRING: Nest boxes provide a needed option for nesting birds that require cavities, which are in short supply. Not all birds utilize nest boxes, but 88 species of cavity nesting birds require a cavity for nesting. Cavities are excavated by woodpeckers, and they are created naturally in trees, often in dead branches and snags. But the number of cavities in any location can be a limiting factor for some species, so by providing an artificial cavity – a nest box – you are helping cavity nesting birds, which is a great conservation service. If you already have birdhouses in your yard, it’s time to make sure they are cleaned out and in good repair – ready for the upcoming nesting season. If you wish to add another nest box or two to the mix, now’s the time to start shopping for – or building – new additions.

It’s also necessary to position a nest box in the correct habitat; for example, wrens prefer an overgrown location, while Tree Swallows and bluebirds prefer an open setting. The height where you position the nest box can be important too; for example, American Kestrels usually prefer a higher position than Wood Ducks. It’s usually not suggested to hang bird houses from a wire or line because birds generally don’t like the movement in the wind, which will reduce the chances your bird house will be used.

Of course, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology is a leader in providing helpful information to birders interested in nest boxes and bird houses. For a variety of information and a bunch of inspiration, refer to https://nestwatch.org/learn/all-about-birdhouses/right-bird-right-house/ and associated web pages.

 

VOLUNTEERS TO ASSIST AMPHIBIANS WITH ROAD CROSSINGS: Community volunteers are getting out in anticipation of annual breeding migrations of salamanders and frogs, which typically begin in mid-March. The volunteers will document their observations as part of DEC's Amphibian Migrations and Road Crossings Project.

After the ground has started to thaw in late winter and early spring, species such as spotted salamander and wood frog emerge from underground winter shelters in the forest and walk overland to woodland pools for breeding. In New York's Hudson Valley, this migration usually occurs on rainy nights from mid-March to early April, when the night air temperature is above 40 degrees Fahrenheit. When these conditions align just so, New York can experience explosive "big night" migrations, with hundreds of amphibians on the move, many having to cross roads.

Volunteers of the Amphibian Migrations and Road Crossings Project document Hudson Valley locations where migrations cross roads, record weather and traffic conditions, and identify and count the amphibians on the move. The volunteers also carefully help the amphibians to safely cross roads.

Now in its 11th year, more than 370 project volunteers have counted 20 species of amphibians and helped nearly 12,000 cross roads. Species reported most frequently during migration nights include spotted salamander, spring peeper, and wood frog. To a lesser degree, volunteers have also observed Jefferson-blue spotted salamander complex and four-toed salamander, species of greatest conservation need in New York, as well as more common species like American toad and redback salamander.

Drivers are encouraged to proceed with caution or avoid travel on the first warm, rainy evenings of the season. Amphibians come out after nightfall and are slow moving; mortality can be high even on low-traffic roads Since the project started in 2009, volunteers have counted at least 5,700 migrating amphibians killed by passing vehicles. For more information, including a short video about amphibian migrations, visit DEC's website or contact woodlandpool@dec.ny.gov.

Project volunteers are encouraged to use the hashtag #amphibianmigrationhv in their photos and posts on social media.

Volunteers of Amphibian Migrations using their headlamps to look at a salamader in the hand of a fellow volunteerA brown salamander spotted with bright yellow spots all over its body in the hand of a volunteer

CHECK OUT DEC'S  LAKE STURGEON TAGGING VIDEO:  Take a look at DEC's efforts to tag young lake sturgeon in the hatchery to track them over their long lifespan. Tagging the sturgeon is one tool used to track the overall recovery of the species in New York. When many more untagged sturgeon are collected in our waters than tagged sturgeon, we will know our recovery efforts are working. View the video.

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

 

MARCH 2019

1-31 - Celebrate Owasco Lake Month at the Finger Lakes Museum & Aquarium, 3369 Guyanoga Road, Branchport, NY. The Museum focuses attention on the lake, home to both cold water & warm water fisheries!  (Free) (For information email mail@fingerlakesmuseum.org.)

14 - Annual State of Lake Ontario Public Meeting at the SUNY Schenectady County Community College, Stockade Building, Room 101, 78 Washington Avenue, Schenectady, NY (Schenectady County). (6:30 – 9:00 pm) The meeting is co-hosted by the Eastern Lake Ontario Salmon and Trout Association. DEC, United States Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources biologists will make a number of presentations, including updates on the status of trout and salmon fisheries, forage fish, stocking programs, and fisheries management plans. Ample time will be provided at the end of the scheduled program for the audience to interact with the presenters. Information summaries for a host of Lake Ontario fisheries assessment programs will be posted at: http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/27068.html prior to the public meetings. (For information contact Christopher Legard, Cape Vincent Fisheries Research Station 315-654-2147)

14 - Educator Workshop: Plt Environmental Experiences For Early Childhood at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (4:00 7:00 pm) Search Learn how to engage young children in outdoor exploration! Attendees receive an interdisciplinary activity guide and music CD. 3 CTLE hours provided. For educators of children ages 3 to 6.  (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

15 - Deadline for removing Ice Shanties from all waters.

15 - Close of Statewide Fishing Seasons for Northern Pike, Pickerel, Tiger Muskellunge and Walleye

15 - Close of Fishing Season for Muskellunge in the Susquehanna River (Tioga County) & the Chemung River and Tributaries (Chemung County)

15 - Close of Finger Lakes Bass Season.

15 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Canisteo Valley Chapter Dinner at The Main Place, Main Streeet, Hornell, NY (6:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Matthew Wilhelm 585-808-9362) 

15-16 - NYDU State Convention and Conservation Celebration at the Ramada Inn Lakefront, Geneva, New York. A celebration of the achievements during 2018.  (Cost: Single (full weekend) $165/Couple (full weekend) $290/Greenwing (full weekend) $50.00/Adult (Fri only) $75/Adult Sat only) $90) (For information go to www.ducks.org/new-york/events)

16 - Start of Catch and Release (Artificial Lures Only) Season for Black Bass in all Finger Lakes except Cayuga, Otisco, Owasco and Skaneateles Lakes. (>6/19/16)

16 - Fishing Ban (No Fishing) on Otselic River from mouth to Whitney Point Reservoir Dam, Susquehanna River in Binghamton between Rock Bottom Dam and Exchange Street Bridge, Susquehanna River in the towns of Union and Vestal from the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad bridge downstream to Murphy's Island, Tioughnioga River from New York Route 26 bridge to US Route 11 bridge, Little Choconut Creek from mouth to Goudey Station Building (Broome County), Dutch Hollow Brook from Owasco Lake upstream to the Route 38A bridge (Cayuga County), Scriba Creek from mouth upstream to Fish Hatchery Dam (Oswego County) (>5/4)

16 – Eastren Lake Ontario Salmon & Trout Association Annual Flea Market at the Brewerton, NY Fire Hall. (For information call 315-515-8278)

16 - Crown City Bassmasters  Hunting & Fishing Extravaganza at the Dryden Fire Station, Dryden, NY. (9:00 am – 2:00 pm) For more info call Joe Matt, 315-420-8150.

16 - Southwestern NY Friends of NRA Banquet at the Seneca Allegany Resort & Casino, 777 Seneca Allegany Blvd., Salamanca, NY (4:30 pm) (Cost: $50.00) (For information contact Ray Patchkofsky 585-307-9824 or email  raymondpatchkofsky@yahoo.com)

16 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Finger Lakes Bucks N’ Beards Chapter Dinner at J B's Bar & Grill, 10832 Gloades Corners Road, Prattsburgh, NY. (5:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Steve Calderwood 607-522-7991  eot_tradingpost.yahoo.com) 

16 - Chemung County Coon Hunters Association Inc Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Rumsey Hill Road, Van Etten, NY. (3:00 pm – Coonhound Event Field Trial-Poor Boy - $12.00/5:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Poor Boy – $12.00/7:00pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $12.00) (For information call Larry Morley at 607-387-9803)

16 - Wine and Wings Raptor Van Tour meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (1:00 – 4:00 pm) The spring migration is here so join us to search for migratory waterfowl, elusive Northern Harriers, breeding Bald Eagles and more! During the tour, we will stop at Izzo’s White Barn Winery and enjoy award-winning wines and learn how vineyards and Important Birds Areas can exist side by side. Fee: $20/adult, includes wine tastings. Must be 21+. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

16-17 - The 72 Annual Batavia Gun and Sportsman Show at the Quality Inn & Suites, 8250 Park Road, Batavia, NY (Sat-9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun-9:00 am – 3:00 pm) This show is hosted by the Alabama Hunt Club. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. 150+ tables. (Cost: $5.00/under 12 free w/adult) (For information contact Denis Davis  585-798-6089  dwdavis70@gmail.com)

17 - Genesee Valley Trappers Association Fur Auction at the Clubhouse, 4462 County Road 32 (3 miles east of Honeoye, south of 20A), Honeoye, NY (6:30 am fur checkin/10:00 am auction) ($10.00 charge for non-members) (For information call Tom Miller, 585-229-4759)

19 - Annual State of Lake Ontario Public Meeting at the Pulaski High School Auditorium, 4624 Salina Street, Pulaski, NY (Oswego County). (6:30 – 9:00 pm) The meeting is co-hosted by the Eastern Lake Ontario Salmon and Trout Association. DEC, United States Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources biologists will make a number of presentations, including updates on the status of trout and salmon fisheries, forage fish, stocking programs, and fisheries management plans. Ample time will be provided at the end of the scheduled program for the audience to interact with the presenters. Information summaries for a host of Lake Ontario fisheries assessment programs will be posted at: http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/27068.html prior to the public meetings. (For information contact Christopher Legard, Cape Vincent Fisheries Research Station 315-654-2147)

20 - Informational Meeting On The State Of Skaneateles Lake Fisheries at the Homer Intermediate School auditorium, 58 Clinton Street, Homer, NY. (6:30 – 8:30 pm) At the meeting, DEC will present summaries of the latest available fisheries research and management strategies and actions on Skaneateles Lake, including future management of the recently established walleye population and contributions from the Citizens Statewide Lake Assessment Program and Eastern Finger Lakes Angler Diary Cooperator Program. The formal presentation is expected to last approximately one hour. An informal question and answer session related to Skaneateles Lake fisheries will follow DEC's presentation. DEC annually stocks Skaneateles Lake with trout. An ongoing Angler Diary Cooperator Program for gamefish provides DEC Fisheries staff with useful data on population trends. Information on the Angler Diary Program and recent reports can be viewed on DEC's website. DEC is continually seeking new cooperators and interested volunteers are encouraged to contact the Region 7 Fisheries Office at (607) 753-3095 ext 213 or fwfish7@dec.ny.gov

21 - Migration Mania Birding Van Tour meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (1:00 – 3:30 pm) The Montezuma Wetlands Complex is Audubon’s first globally significant Important Bird Area because of the incredible number of waterfowl that stop here during the migration seasons. Enjoy a leisurely ride in our van to explore Montezuma’s birding hot spots where thousands of ducks, geese and swans can be seen. Bald Eagles, Northern Harriers, and other raptors are a possibility too. Binoculars and bird guides will be provided. Fee: $8/child; $15/adult. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

21 - NYSDEC Electro Shocking of Naples Creek – Crew starts just north of the Village of Naples, Ontario County, at the Route 245 bridge. (9:00 am) The sampling is conducted to aid in the ongoing assessment of Finger Lakes fisheries management practices and to provide up-to-date information for the opening day fishing forecast.  (For information call 585-226-5324)

22 – NYSDEC Electro Shocking of Cold Brook (Keuka Inlet) – Crew starts in the hamlet of Pleasant Valley, Steuben County. (10:00 am) The sampling is conducted to aid in the ongoing assessment of Finger Lakes fisheries management practices and to provide up-to-date information for the opening day fishing forecast.  (For information call 585-226-5324)

22 – Registration Deadline for April 12th Falconry, Wildlife Rehabilitator And Leashed Tracking Dog Examinations: The exams are scheduled for 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at most DEC Regional Offices across the state. To apply for any of these exams, visit the DEC Special Licenses Unit website and complete an exam registration form. Applicants can mail, fax, or email the completed form to: NYS DEC Special Licenses Unit, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-4752 Phone: 518-402-8985, Fax: 518-402-8925, Email: SpecialLicenses@dec.ny.gov.

22 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Chemung Valley Ridgerunners Chapter Dinner at the Elmira Holiday Inn Riverview, 760 E. Water Street, Elmira, NY. (6:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Chad McDonald 607-738-2050 cltcmcdolald24@yahoo.com) 

23 - 8th Annual Fisherman’s Paradise Flea Market/Swap Meet at the Alexander Firemen’s Rec Hall, 10708 Route 98, Alexander, NY.

23 – Lake Ontario Fisheries Symposium sponsored by NY Sea Grant and the Lake Ontario Sportfishing Promotion Council at the Finger Lakes Mall (adjacent to Bass Pro), Auburn, NY. (10:00 am – 4:00 pm)  Come see presentations and expert panels to learn about everything from fish basics to cutting edge technology. Door prizes, kids activities, fish tanks and displays, outdoor and fishing gear vendors, and more. Something for everyone from beginners to seasoned veterans. Presenters and panelists will include professional anglers, managers, and scientists from around Lake Ontario. (For information/register for free go to https://reg.cce.cornell.edu/LakeOntarioFisheriesSymposium_112.)

23 - Make A Reusable Bag at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:00 - 4:00 pm) Stop in with your old t-shirts and plastic bags and we’ll help you transform them into reusable bags for all your shopping needs. (For information call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

23 - National Wild Turkey Federation – CrossRoads Limbhangers Chapter Dinner at the Lima Country Club, 7470 Chase Road, Lima, NY. (5:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Neil Gottfried  585-245-3051  longbeardg@gmail.com)

23 – Elmira Beagle Club Beagle Event at their clubhouse at 1485 Breesport-N Chemung Road, Lowman, NY (8:00 am Beagle Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Timothy Hall 607-331-1660  or email moc.evil@selgaebtniopkcehc)

23 - Greater Rochester QDMA Banquet at the Double Tree, Rochester. (4:30 pm) (For information call David Perotto, 585-410-5551.)

23-24 – 41st Annual Maple Sugaring at the Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, NY. (Breakfast 9:00 am-1:00 pm/Trail Demonstrations 10:00 am – 2:00 pm) Explore the science and lore of maple syrup production with volunteer guides along the CNC Pioneer Trail and also enjoy a pancake breakfast. On the trail, participants learn how a tree makes sap and discover the different processing techniques while enjoying the outdoors. Other highlights include a 100 percent pure maple syrup tasting in the sugarhouse, and a pancake meal in the visitors center. All meals include pure maple syrup and a choice of beverage. Maple Sugaring is the CNC’s major annual fundraising event and helps maintain CNC operations. (Meal Cost: Adult - $10.00/Kids - $8.00) (For information call 585-374-6160)

30 - Otisco Lake Rod & Gun Club Traders Day at the Club, Rte. 174 (3015 Marietta Rd.), Marietta, NY (one mile south of Rte. 20). For more info call Keith Severson, 607-343-1906.

30 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Genesee Local Chapter Dinner at the Quality Inn & Suites, 8250 Park Road, Batavia, NY. (6:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Terry Young 585-343-8350 tyoung14143@gmail.com)  

30 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Catharine Valley Long Spurs Chapter Dinner at the Watkins Glen Community Center, Route 414, Watkins Glen, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Wally Wasson 607-546-4859 wasson3970@aol.com)

30 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Springville Strutters Chapter Dinner at the St. Aloysius Church Hall, 186 Franklin Street, Springville, NY. (5:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Richard Gerlach 716-857-0586 r905g@yahoo.com) 

30 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Springville Strutters Chapter Wito at Erie County Conservation Club, Miller Avenue, Chaffee, NY (9:00 am) A great time to help raise vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Becky Werchowski 716-942-6858 viewofcountry@yahoo.com)

30 - Chemung County Coon Hunters Association Inc Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Rumsey Hill Road, Van Etten, NY. (3:00 pm – Coonhound Event Field Trial-Poor Boy - $12.00/5:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Poor Boy – $12.00/7:00pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $12.00) (For information call Larry Morley at 607-387-9803)

30 - Elmira Beagle Club Beagle Event at their clubhouse at 1485 Breesport-N Chemung Road, Lowman, NY (8:00 am Beagle Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Timothy Hall 607-331-1660  or email moc.evil@selgaebtniopkcehc)

30 - Who’s Awake at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am) On this walk we will search for early risers and migrants in the woods. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov) 

30 – Birding 101: Class #3 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) What bird am I? Come learn the general types of birds found in the woods. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

30 - Braddock Bay Hawk Watch Trip meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (9:00 am – 4:00 pm) Braddock Bay is a bird migration hot spot located on the southern shore of Lake Ontario just west of Rochester, New York and early spring is the perfect time to look to the skies for many species of raptors migrating through the area. Join us for a day-long van trip to Braddock Bay Raptor Research (BBRR) for the chance to see hundreds (thousands if the conditions are right) of hawks, vultures, eagles, owls, waterfowl and songbirds migrating overhead. We’ll meet with BBRR President Daena Ford for a live bird of prey presentation, take a short walk through Owl Woods searching for roosting Saw Whet Owls and Long-eared Owls, and we’ll also explore the raptor banding station. Please pack a lunch, wear sturdy shoes, and dress for the weather. Fee: $20/child, $30/adult. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

30-31 – 41st Annual Maple Sugaring at the Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, NY. (Breakfast 9:00 am-1:00 pm/Trail Demonstrations 10:00 am – 2:00 pm) Explore the science and lore of maple syrup production with volunteer guides along the CNC Pioneer Trail and also enjoy a pancake breakfast. On the trail, participants learn how a tree makes sap and discover the different processing techniques while enjoying the outdoors. Other highlights include a 100 percent pure maple syrup tasting in the sugarhouse, and a pancake meal in the visitors center. All meals include pure maple syrup and a choice of beverage. Maple Sugaring is the CNC’s major annual fundraising event and helps maintain CNC operations. (Meal Cost: Adult - $10.00/Kids - $8.00) (For information call 585-374-6160)

31 - Close of Catch and Release (Artificial Lures Only) Season for Trout in Salmon Creek (Cayuga County), Salmon Creek Above Ludlow Falls & West Branch Owego Creek (Tompkins County), Spring Creek on Caledonia State Fish Hatchery Property (8:00 am B 4:00 pm) (Livingston County), Oatka Creek from Bowerman Road Upstream to Union Street and from the Wheatland Center Road Upstream to the Mouth of Spring Creek, and Spring Creek (Monroe County), East Koy & Wiscoy Creeks (Allegany County), Clear Creek, Lime Lake Outlet, McKinstry Creek, Elm Creek, Elton Creek, Mansfield Creek and Cattaraugus Creek Upstream of Springville Dam (Cattaraugus County), Hosmer Brook and Cattaraugus Creek Upstream of Springville Dam (Erie County), Wiscoy Creek (Minus Section 2 mile Each Side of East Hillside Road Bridge), East Koy Creek, Cattaraugus Creek Upstream of Springville Dam and Clear Creek from Mouth to County Line (Wyoming County)

31 – Close of Crow Hunting Season

31 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Between-the-Lakes Chapter Dinner at the South Seneca Sportsman’s Club, 6894 Yamell Road, Ovid, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Shane Hayward 607-351-8830 shanehayward9@gmail.com) 

31 - Finger Lakes Trollers Fishing Tackle, Outdoor Show and Flea Market at the Community Center at Clute Park, Watkins Glen, NY (9:00 am – 2:00 pm) New, used and antique fishing tackle,fishing charters,archery, turkery hunting stuff,etc. There will be about 70 tables set up. (Tables are sold out). (Admission is $2.00 with kids under 10 free. Parking is free.) (For information call Mike Burt 607-765-9866)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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3 - 15 – 19

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

RAINBOW TROUT SAMPLING: DEC announced the dates and locations for the annual sampling of the rainbow trout run in Finger Lakes tributaries. This year, sampling is scheduled for: Thursday, March 21, 9 a.m., at Naples Creek, just north of the village of Naples, Ontario County, at the Rt. 245 bridge; and Friday, March 22, 10 a.m., at Cold Brook (Keuka Inlet) in the hamlet of Pleasant Valley, Steuben County. DEC is conducting the sampling to aid in the agency's ongoing assessment of Finger Lakes fisheries management practices and to provide up-to-date information for the opening day fishing forecast.

During sampling, data will be collected for each fish, including length, weight, sex, and spawning condition. A scale from the fish is used to determine age and growth rate. Sampling results will be available to the public at the DEC Region 8 Fisheries Office prior to the April 1 opening of the "inland" trout fishing season. Anglers wanting to fish for trout before April 1 are reminded that trout fishing is open year-round in the main bodies of the Finger Lakes.

 

DEAD FISH MAY SHOW UP AS ICE BEGINS TO THAW:


Winter conditions – very cold temperatures and heavy snow over ice, for example – can kill fish and other aquatic creatures like turtles, frogs, toads and crayfish. When ice and snow start to melt in the spring, it’s likely that people will begin to discover those deaths.

"Winterkill is the most common type of fish kill," said Gary Whelan, the Michigan DNR Fisheries Division’s research manager. "As the season changes, it can be common in shallow lakes, ponds, streams and canals. These kills are localized and typically don’t affect the overall health of fish populations or fishing quality."

Shallow lakes with excess vegetation and soft bottoms are prone to winterkill. When aquatic vegetation under ice and snow dies from lack of sunlight, it uses up dissolved oxygen as it decays, and that creates fish kill conditions. Canals in urban areas also are susceptible due to run-off and pollution from roads and lawns and septic systems, again using up dissolved oxygen through the decay of vegetation and organic materials in sediments.

“Fish and other aquatic life typically die in late winter but may not be noticed until a month after the ice melts, because the dead fish are temporarily preserved on the lake bottom by the cold water. Once the water warms up, bacterial activity results in the dead fish coming to the surface,” Whelan said. “Fish also are affected by rapid water temperature changes due to unseasonably warm weather, leading to stress and sometimes mortality.”

Fish can get easily stressed as they often have low energy reserves in late winter and food is scarce. That equals less adaptability to low oxygen and temperature swings.

Anyone spotting a fish kill in larger quantities – 25 fish or more – should report it using the Sick or Dead Aquatic Species form available under the fish icon at Michigan.gov/EyesInTheField. People also can contact local DNR offices. It’s important to report observations as soon as possible, allowing fisheries staff to collect the best-quality fish for analysis.

For more information, visit Michigan.gov/FishHealth or contact Gary Whelan, 517-284-5840 or Elyse Walter, 517-284-5839.

 

LANDOWNERS INVITED TO PROVIDE INPUT ON FOREST TAX LAW PROGRAM:

NYS landowners with more than 50 acres of private forested land may be eligible for DEC's Forest Tax Law Program. DEC's Division of Lands and Forests is seeking public input on the Forest Tax Law Program, Real Property Tax Law Section 480-a. The Forest Tax Law was enacted in 1974 to give forest landowners with 50 acres or more of qualifying land in New York State and incentive for conducting sustainable timber harvests. Currently, there are 3,400+ forest landowners and more than 1.2 million acres of private forest land enrolled in the program. DEC is seeking public input to determine ways to increase compliance, reduce administrative burdens, and improve forestry outcomes. Program changes under considerations will not alter the annual tax benefit, stumpage tax, commitment period, or penalties for non-compliance.

Since late February, DEC has been gathering comments on the proposed changes at public meetings across the state. DEC will also host a webinar that can be accessed via a computer or phone on April 5th for those who cannot participate in-person. For more information about this program, as well as details on the webinar and remaining meetings, visit our website.

 

SCHOOL SEEDLING PROGRAM APPLICATIONS DUE MARCH 31ST:

Teachers may receive free tree or shrub seedlings to plant with their students. Hey teachers and youth club leaders! Want to help pass on a care for conservation and stewardship to your students? Sign up for DEC's School Seedling Program from the Saratoga Tree Nursery! New York schools and youth-oriented clubs can apply to receive an order of 30-50 trees or shrubs to plant with their students. Looking for some tree planting inspiration? Arbor Day is just around the corner on 4/26 - a planting event is a great way to celebrate this holiday and the many benefits trees provide us with!  Applications for the School Seedling Program are due March 31st. If you need assistance, contact your regional DEC Lands and Forests office for specific information about the program. Each school or organization may receive one order per year.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Ice is Not an Excuse - Onondaga County:  On March 1, ECO Don Damrath was busy checking ice fisherman on Otisco Lake in the town of Spafford when he observed an excavator in the distance working along the shoreline. A closer inspection revealed contractors repairing and replacing an existing limestone rock wall. The problem was that they were extending the wall a few feet out and placing fill into the lake, all without a permit. The contractors claimed "someone" advised them that if the lake was frozen and that the work did not require a permit or erosion mitigation measures. The subjects could not provide a name or documentation ECO Damrath advised the workers to remove the unlawful fill by hand, install silt fencing to protect water quality, and await further inspection by Region 7 habitat biologist Tiffany Toukatly. Otisco Lake is the most easterly of the 11 Finger Lakes and supports populations of panfish, bass, and tiger muskellunge. As a result of the unauthorized work, the contractor was charged for violating ECL Article 15 and is facing $1,500 in penalties.

Large ditch that has been dug up by large construction machinery
Unpermitted work on shoreline of Otisco Lake

Funeral Detail for Retired DLE Director Donald W. Brewer - Seneca County: On March 8, family, friends, and more than 30 members from DEC's Division of Law Enforcement gathered to pay their respects at funeral services for retired DLE Director Donald "Wayne" Brewer. Director Brewer died unexpectedly but peacefully on Feb. 12 at the age of 69. Brewer began his career with DLE in 1973 and rose through the ranks to be appointed Director in 1997 at 47. Upon retirement, Brewer returned to his beloved Seneca County, fulfilling a promise he made to come home and serve his community. He was a prolific freelance outdoor writer with countless articles published in local and regional newspapers, national environmental magazines, and trade journals. Harboring a deep love for the environment and wildlife, Brewer spent his retirement years encouraging young men and women to revere and protect nature by entering environmental professions. DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos said, "Wayne will be greatly missed, but we will honor his legacy by continuing the conservation and preservation efforts he fought for his entire life."

 

PENNSYLVANIA CONTINUES TO LEAD NATION IN DEER-VEHICLE ACCIDENTS:

According to the 2019 QDMA Whitetail Report, the Keystone State continues to far surpass all other states in terms of deer-vehicle collisions, comprising more than 10 percent of the nation’s estimated total of deer-related accidents as a whole.

Based on industry data provided by State Farm Insurance, Pennsylvania filed an estimated 141,777 claims from July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018, which is a conservative total since it’s based on comprehensive and collision claims, and doesn’t even include policy-holders with solely liability insurance.

Rounding out the top five states of the nation’s 1,330,276 overall deer-vehicle-accident claims during this time period are, in order: Michigan (87,959), New York (72,314), North Carolina (64,200), and Texas (60,857). Pennsylvania tops second-place Michigan by 53,818 accidents.

Pennsylvania also led the pack in terms of deer-vehicle accidents per road mile with 0.57 deer-related crashes per road mile. Maryland was a distant second (0.43), followed by Delaware (0.39), Virginia (0.37), and Michigan (0.34) in the top five. The majority of accidents occurred during spring fawning and fall breeding seasons.

The whopping 141,777 collisions registered in 2017-18 marks a 23-percent increase since 2011-12, when Pennsylvania filed 115,571 claims, and a 28-percent increase since 2002-03, when 111,1142 claims were filed.

With an estimated 367,159 deer harvested in the 2017-18 hunting seasons, the deer-vehicle accident total equated to roughly 39-percent of the overall state harvest. That same year, Pennsylvania hunters ranked third in the nation for both antlered buck harvest (163,750) and antlerless harvest (203,409), and ranked second for antlered buck harvest per square mile (3.7). It was third for antlerless harvest per square mile (4.5).

The annual QDMA Whitetail Report is compiled and written by Quality Deer Management Association staff as a comprehensive resource for reporting the status of white-tailed deer, commonly regarded as the foundation of the hunting industry in North America. It is available for purchase at www.qdma.com.

 

HOW TO AVOID WILDLIFE COLLISIONS: As daylight saving time begins, here are some tips to help you avoid wildlife collisions:

>Be especially alert at dawn and dusk.

>Heed wildlife crossing signs. These signs are usually placed in areas known to have a high volume of wildlife/vehicle collisions.

>Be alert on roadways near wooded, agricultural and wetland areas and also near lakes and streams.

>Scan both sides of the road. Invite passengers to help watch for wildlife.

>Do not drive distracted. Put away food, phones and other distractions.

>When possible, use high beam headlights to illuminate the road.

>Look for an animal's eyeshine, which can be seen from a distance. Slow down once you have spotted an animal near the roadside.

>Some animals travel in groups, so be sure to watch for additional animals if you see one.

>Do not throw trash out of your vehicle. Trash and food scraps can draw animals to roadways.

What to do if you see an animal near or in the road

>Do not swerve for a deer or small animal. Stay in your lane and slow down.

>If several animals are standing in the road, do not try to drive through them or get out of the vehicle to chase or herd them. Honk your horn and flash your lights to encourage them to move on.

>If an animal has crossed the road, continue to drive slowly and be cautious because it may try to cross again

What to do if you hit an animal

>Pull off the road and use your hazard lights if your car is undriveable.

>Do not try to approach an injured animal.

>Call 911 or contact your local police department if you were injured or if the animal is in the roadway and could pose a threat to public safety.

 

VIRAL GATOR IS TRUE: Biologists with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources are letting folks know that a viral gator photo going around the internet lately is no hoax.

“Apparently a lot of people think it’s fake, but I assure you that it is not,” said Brent Howze, a DNR wildlife biologist. “I’m the one in the picture, and you can probably tell that I didn’t get too close to it.”

The 700-pound beast was found in an irrigation ditch near Lake Blackshear after a farmer discovered it and called the DNR. Unfortunately, the reptile was in pretty bad shape with what appeared to be “gunshot wounds,” Howze told the Cordele Dispatch. “It’s an unfortunate situation, but the best thing for the animal was to put it down.”

It was an absolutely massive alligator, which reportedly measured 13-feet, 4-inches and was estimated to weigh roughly 700-pounds.

 

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

MARCH 2019
1 - Start of Fishing Ban (No Fishing) on North McMillan Creek and Conesus Inlet WMA from Conesus Lake South to the Dam (Livingston County) except the canal west of the inlet and that portion of the north of the canal. (>5/4)

1-31 - Celebrate Owasco Lake Month at the Finger Lakes Museum & Aquarium, 3369 Guyanoga Road, Branchport, NY. The Museum focuses attention on the lake, home to both cold water & warm water fisheries!  (Free) (For information email mail@fingerlakesmuseum.org.)

15 - Deadline for removing Ice Shanties from all waters.

15 - Close of Statewide Fishing Seasons for Northern Pike, Pickerel, Tiger Muskellunge and Walleye

15 - Close of Fishing Season for Muskellunge in the Susquehanna River (Tioga County) & the Chemung River and Tributaries (Chemung County)

15 - Close of Finger Lakes Bass Season.

15 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Canisteo Valley Chapter Dinner at The Main Place, Main Streeet, Hornell, NY (6:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Matthew Wilhelm 585-808-9362) 

15-16 - NYDU State Convention and Conservation Celebration at the Ramada Inn Lakefront, Geneva, New York. A celebration of the achievements during 2018.  (Cost: Single (full weekend) $165/Couple (full weekend) $290/Greenwing (full weekend) $50.00/Adult (Fri only) $75/Adult Sat only) $90) (For information go to www.ducks.org/new-york/events)

16 - Start of Catch and Release (Artificial Lures Only) Season for Black Bass in all Finger Lakes except Cayuga, Otisco, Owasco and Skaneateles Lakes. (>6/19/16)

16 - Fishing Ban (No Fishing) on Otselic River from mouth to Whitney Point Reservoir Dam, Susquehanna River in Binghamton between Rock Bottom Dam and Exchange Street Bridge, Susquehanna River in the towns of Union and Vestal from the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad bridge downstream to Murphy's Island, Tioughnioga River from New York Route 26 bridge to US Route 11 bridge, Little Choconut Creek from mouth to Goudey Station Building (Broome County), Dutch Hollow Brook from Owasco Lake upstream to the Route 38A bridge (Cayuga County), Scriba Creek from mouth upstream to Fish Hatchery Dam (Oswego County) (>5/4)

16 – Eastren Lake Ontario Salmon & Trout Association Annual Flea Market at the Brewerton, NY Fire Hall. (For information call 315-515-8278)

16 - Crown City Bassmasters  Hunting & Fishing Extravaganza at the Dryden Fire Station, Dryden, NY. (9:00 am – 2:00 pm) For more info call Joe Matt, 315-420-8150.

16 - Southwestern NY Friends of NRA Banquet at the Seneca Allegany Resort & Casino, 777 Seneca Allegany Blvd., Salamanca, NY (4:30 pm) (Cost: $50.00) (For information contact Ray Patchkofsky 585-307-9824 or email  raymondpatchkofsky@yahoo.com)

16 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Finger Lakes Bucks N’ Beards Chapter Dinner at J B's Bar & Grill, 10832 Gloades Corners Road, Prattsburgh, NY. (5:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Steve Calderwood 607-522-7991  eot_tradingpost.yahoo.com) 

16 - Chemung County Coon Hunters Association Inc Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Rumsey Hill Road, Van Etten, NY. (3:00 pm – Coonhound Event Field Trial-Poor Boy - $12.00/5:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Poor Boy – $12.00/7:00pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $12.00) (For information call Larry Morley at 607-387-9803)

16 - Wine and Wings Raptor Van Tour meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (1:00 – 4:00 pm) The spring migration is here so join us to search for migratory waterfowl, elusive Northern Harriers, breeding Bald Eagles and more! During the tour, we will stop at Izzo’s White Barn Winery and enjoy award-winning wines and learn how vineyards and Important Birds Areas can exist side by side. Fee: $20/adult, includes wine tastings. Must be 21+. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

16-17 - The 72 Annual Batavia Gun and Sportsman Show at the Quality Inn & Suites, 8250 Park Road, Batavia, NY (Sat-9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun-9:00 am – 3:00 pm) This show is hosted by the Alabama Hunt Club. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. 150+ tables. (Cost: $5.00/under 12 free w/adult) (For information contact Denis Davis  585-798-6089  dwdavis70@gmail.com)

17 - Genesee Valley Trappers Association Fur Auction at the Clubhouse, 4462 County Road 32 (3 miles east of Honeoye, south of 20A), Honeoye, NY (6:30 am fur checkin/10:00 am auction) ($10.00 charge for non-members) (For information call Tom Miller, 585-229-4759)

19 - Annual State of Lake Ontario Public Meeting at the Pulaski High School Auditorium, 4624 Salina Street, Pulaski, NY (Oswego County). (6:30 – 9:00 pm) The meeting is co-hosted by the Eastern Lake Ontario Salmon and Trout Association. DEC, United States Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources biologists will make a number of presentations, including updates on the status of trout and salmon fisheries, forage fish, stocking programs, and fisheries management plans. Ample time will be provided at the end of the scheduled program for the audience to interact with the presenters. Information summaries for a host of Lake Ontario fisheries assessment programs will be posted at: http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/27068.html prior to the public meetings. (For information contact Christopher Legard, Cape Vincent Fisheries Research Station 315-654-2147)

20 - Informational Meeting On The State Of Skaneateles Lake Fisheries at the Homer Intermediate School auditorium, 58 Clinton Street, Homer, NY. (6:30 – 8:30 pm) At the meeting, DEC will present summaries of the latest available fisheries research and management strategies and actions on Skaneateles Lake, including future management of the recently established walleye population and contributions from the Citizens Statewide Lake Assessment Program and Eastern Finger Lakes Angler Diary Cooperator Program. The formal presentation is expected to last approximately one hour. An informal question and answer session related to Skaneateles Lake fisheries will follow DEC's presentation. DEC annually stocks Skaneateles Lake with trout. An ongoing Angler Diary Cooperator Program for gamefish provides DEC Fisheries staff with useful data on population trends. Information on the Angler Diary Program and recent reports can be viewed on DEC's website. DEC is continually seeking new cooperators and interested volunteers are encouraged to contact the Region 7 Fisheries Office at (607) 753-3095 ext 213 or fwfish7@dec.ny.gov

21 - Migration Mania Birding Van Tour meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (1:00 – 3:30 pm) The Montezuma Wetlands Complex is Audubon’s first globally significant Important Bird Area because of the incredible number of waterfowl that stop here during the migration seasons. Enjoy a leisurely ride in our van to explore Montezuma’s birding hot spots where thousands of ducks, geese and swans can be seen. Bald Eagles, Northern Harriers, and other raptors are a possibility too. Binoculars and bird guides will be provided. Fee: $8/child; $15/adult. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

21 - NYSDEC Electro Shocking of Naples Creek – Crew starts just north of the Village of Naples, Ontario County, at the Route 245 bridge. (9:00 am) The sampling is conducted to aid in the ongoing assessment of Finger Lakes fisheries management practices and to provide up-to-date information for the opening day fishing forecast.  (For information call 585-226-5324)

22 – NYSDEC Electro Shocking of Cold Brook (Keuka Inlet) – Crew starts in the hamlet of Pleasant Valley, Steuben County. (10:00 am) The sampling is conducted to aid in the ongoing assessment of Finger Lakes fisheries management practices and to provide up-to-date information for the opening day fishing forecast.  (For information call 585-226-5324)

22 – Registration Deadline for April 12th Falconry, Wildlife Rehabilitator And Leashed Tracking Dog Examinations: The exams are scheduled for 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at most DEC Regional Offices across the state. To apply for any of these exams, visit the DEC Special Licenses Unit website and complete an exam registration form. Applicants can mail, fax, or email the completed form to: NYS DEC Special Licenses Unit, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-4752 Phone: 518-402-8985, Fax: 518-402-8925, Email: SpecialLicenses@dec.ny.gov.

22 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Chemung Valley Ridgerunners Chapter Dinner at the Elmira Holiday Inn Riverview, 760 E. Water Street, Elmira, NY. (6:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Chad McDonald 607-738-2050 cltcmcdolald24@yahoo.com) 

23 - 8th Annual Fisherman’s Paradise Flea Market/Swap Meet at the Alexander Firemen’s Rec Hall, 10708 Route 98, Alexander, NY.

23 – Lake Ontario Fisheries Symposium sponsored by NY Sea Grant and the Lake Ontario Sportfishing Promotion Council at the Finger Lakes Mall (adjacent to Bass Pro), Auburn, NY. (10:00 am – 4:00 pm)  Come see presentations and expert panels to learn about everything from fish basics to cutting edge technology. Door prizes, kids activities, fish tanks and displays, outdoor and fishing gear vendors, and more. Something for everyone from beginners to seasoned veterans. Presenters and panelists will include professional anglers, managers, and scientists from around Lake Ontario. (For information/register for free go to https://reg.cce.cornell.edu/LakeOntarioFisheriesSymposium_112.)

23 - Make A Reusable Bag at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:00 - 4:00 pm) Stop in with your old t-shirts and plastic bags and we’ll help you transform them into reusable bags for all your shopping needs. (For information call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

23 - National Wild Turkey Federation – CrossRoads Limbhangers Chapter Dinner at the Lima Country Club, 7470 Chase Road, Lima, NY. (5:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Neil Gottfried  585-245-3051  longbeardg@gmail.com)

23 – Elmira Beagle Club Beagle Event at their clubhouse at 1485 Breesport-N Chemung Road, Lowman, NY (8:00 am Beagle Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Timothy Hall 607-331-1660  or email moc.evil@selgaebtniopkcehc)

23 - Greater Rochester QDMA Banquet at the Double Tree, Rochester. (4:30 pm) (For information call David Perotto, 585-410-5551.)

23-24 – 41st Annual Maple Sugaring at the Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, NY. (Breakfast 9:00 am-1:00 pm/Trail Demonstrations 10:00 am – 2:00 pm) Explore the science and lore of maple syrup production with volunteer guides along the CNC Pioneer Trail and also enjoy a pancake breakfast. On the trail, participants learn how a tree makes sap and discover the different processing techniques while enjoying the outdoors. Other highlights include a 100 percent pure maple syrup tasting in the sugarhouse, and a pancake meal in the visitors center. All meals include pure maple syrup and a choice of beverage. Maple Sugaring is the CNC’s major annual fundraising event and helps maintain CNC operations. (Meal Cost: Adult - $10.00/Kids - $8.00) (For information call 585-374-6160)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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3 - 8 – 19

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

 

"STATE OF LAKE ONTARIO" MEETINGS: The public will have the opportunity to learn about the State of Lake Ontario fisheries at public meetings to be held in Niagara, Monroe, Oswego and Schenectady counties in March.

New York's Lake Ontario waters comprise more than 2.7 million acres. The open lake, embayments, and tributaries support thriving populations of sportfish, including trout, salmon, bass, walleye, yellow perch, and panfish. A recent statewide angler survey estimated more than 2.6 million angler days were spent on Lake Ontario and major tributaries, resulting in an estimated economic value of $112 million annually to local communities.

Staff from DEC and the United States Geological Survey will make a number of presentations, including updates on the status of trout and salmon fisheries in the lake and its tributaries, forage fish, and stocking programs. The meetings will provide ample time at the end of the scheduled program for the audience to ask questions and interact with the presenters Information about DEC's Lake Ontario fisheries assessment programs can be found on DEC's website.

Remaining Meeting dates and locations are:

Thursday, March 14: 6:30 - 9 p.m. at SUNY Schenectady County Community College, Stockade Building, Room 101, 78 Washington Ave., Schenectady, Schenectady County.

Tuesday, March 19: 6:30 - 9 p.m. at the Pulaski High School auditorium, 4624 Salina St., Pulaski, Oswego County The meeting is co-hosted by the Eastern Lake Ontario Salmon and Trout Association.

For further information contact Christopher Legard, NYSDEC Lake Ontario Unit Leader at the Cape Vincent Fisheries Research Station, (315) 654-2147.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Endangered Species Protection - Livingston County: Region 8 ECOs recently conducted a unique detail in an effort to protect an endangered species while assisting local landowners with traffic and public safety issues. For years, short-eared owls have been using a Livingston County neighborhood as winter feeding grounds. The owls are easily photographed as they fly low to the ground in this picturesque area, hunting for rodents. Word spread on social media, and members of the public began showing up, parking on the road, and setting up camera tripods. This year, ECOs received a complaint that someone had launched a drone to pursue the owls in an attempt to capture video. The increased traffic has also caused headaches for local residents. ECOs have spent time in the area over the last few weeks, speaking with numerous bird enthusiasts and educating them on the laws protecting endangered and threatened species. ECOs have also attempted to mediate the parking, traffic, and trespassing issues. Through this outreach, the officers are hopeful the owls will remain undisturbed and continue to winter in this unique area.

Owl sitting on a fence post in a field.
Short-eared owl perched on a Livingston County fencepost;
photo courtesy of New York State Police Captain Gallivan

Police Snowmobile Training - Oswego County: During the week of Feb. 18 to 22, DEC Division of Law Enforcement (DLE) instructors from Regions 4, 5, and 6 conducted two Basic Snowmobile Operator Courses at the DLE training academy in Pulaski. The course was attended by students from the New York State Police, Pulaski Police Department, Oswego County Sheriff's Office, Monroe County Sheriff's Office, Albany County Sheriff's Office, Village of Phoenix Police Department, and DLE members from across the state. Twenty-eight officers completed the training that focused on the skills needed to safely operate police snowmobiles in tough terrain.

Three snow mobiles with various law enforcement lined up behind them.
Instructors and students at DLE police snowmobile training

Burning Down the House - Chautauqua County: On Feb. 26, ECO Jerry Kinney responded to a complaint of an illegal open fire in the town of Poland. ECO Kinney arrived to find that an entire house had been demolished and was being burned to the ground. There were two large piles of debris burning on site, including drywall, roofing shingles, metal, and insulation. Due to the size of the fires, the Kennedy Fire Department responded to put the flames down. ECO Kinney ticketed the owner of the property for illegal disposal of solid waste and open burning of prohibited material.

Fire truck parked in front of smoldering debris of former house
Kennedy Fire Department working to extinguish illegally burned house

 

SNOWMOBILERS REFRAIN FROM ALCOHOL USE WHILE ON THE TRAILS: State officials would like to remind snowmobilers to never drink and drive, and to ride responsibly while enjoying the state's abundant snowmobile trails.

In New York, a snowmobile driver can be charged with Snowmobiling While Intoxicated (SWI) if he or she operates a vehicle under the influence of alcohol. Any snowmobile driver with a Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) of 0.08 percent or higher can be charged with an SWI, the snowmobile equivalent of a Driving While Intoxicated (DWI) offense. A misdemeanor conviction can result in a permanent criminal record, a maximum fine of $1500, up to 90 days in jail, and a 12-month suspension of snowmobiling privileges. Intoxication can be proven through different types of evidence including BAC chemical tests (breath, blood, or urine), law enforcement's observations, and other factors. An SWI charge is upgraded to a felony when there are two prior convictions.

Also, a snowmobile driver can be charged with Snowmobiling While Ability Impaired (SWAI). The penalty for a SWAI conviction can include a fine up to $350, jail time up to 15 days, and a suspension of snowmobile privileges for six months. A second type of SWAI charge involves driving a snowmobile while under the influence of drugs. Similar to a DWAI-Drugs, the SWAI-Drugs charge is a misdemeanor offense that can be brought against any snowmobiler who operates the vehicle while on drugs. If convicted, an SWAI-Drugs charge can bring harsh penalties, including a fine up to $500, jail time up to 90 days, and a one-year suspension of your snowmobile registration and privileges.

Everyone operating a snowmobile should be familiar with safe riding practices and all applicable laws, rules and regulations. The best way to learn is by taking a snowmobile safety course. To find a course, visit the Parks website. Before deciding to head out, riders are also reminded to check trail conditions with local snowmobile clubs. To find a club, visit the New York State Snowmobile Association (NYSSA) website.

Top safety recommendations include:

>Be aware that fluctuating weather late in the season can quickly result in unsafe conditions - including blow downs, low hanging branches, water hazards, ice, washouts and exposed hazards due to minimal snow coverage.

>Check over your snowmobile; make sure it is in good working order and carry emergency supplies.

>Always wear a helmet and make sure you wear the proper snowmobile-riding gear including bibs, jackets, boots and gloves.

>Always ride with a buddy or at least one other person.

>Ride responsibly. Ride within your ability, ride to the right and operate at a safe and prudent speed at all times. Respect landowners, obey posted signs and stay on the marked trail.

>Frozen bodies of water are not designated trails; if you plan to ride on ice, proceed with caution and be aware of potential hazards under the snow as well as ice thickness.

Four inches of ice is usually safe for accessing ice on foot. Double that thickness for traveling on white ice. Ice thickness can vary on every body of water or even within the same body of water. The presence of snowmobile tracks or footprints on the ice should not be considered evidence of safe ice conditions. Individuals are strongly encouraged to check ice conditions and avoid situations that appear to present even a remote risk. Testing the thickness of ice can be done with an auger or ice spud at various spots.

>Never drink alcohol or use drugs and ride.

State Park and DEC Police will continue patrolling and issuing tickets for snowmobiling violations - including snowmobiling while intoxicated, imprudent speed, reckless operation and driving unregistered snowmobiles.

OPRHP oversees the development, maintenance and oversight of a statewide snowmobile program, which features approximately 10,400 miles of state-designated snowmobile trails. For more information on snowmobiling in New York, visit the Parks website.

 

LOOK FOR WILDLIFE TRACKS THIS WINTER: Now is a great time to search for winter tracks (PDF) or other animal signs visible in the snow. It can be fun to be a detective and figure out what animals have been walking through your yard or across a trail. Here are a few tips to get you started:

>Snow conditions can make a difference in a track’s appearance – wet snow captures a print better than powdery snow.

>Members in the dog family (coyote, fox, or dogs) will usually leave claw prints above the toes, while the cat family (bobcat or housecat) will not. You should see four toes on both front and back feet for both families.

>Rodents, such as squirrels, chipmunks, mice, muskrats, and voles, usually have four toes on the front feet and five on the back. Claws may or may not be seen.

>Bring a notebook, camera, or field guide with you.

>Sometimes an animal’s droppings, or scat, can help you identify it - a rabbit’s scat looks like Cocoa Puffs. Deer droppings are about the same size but are more football shaped.

Find out more in the Become a Winter Wildlife Detective (PDF) issue of Conservationist for Kids.

                                                     Deer and Rabbit Tracks

 

VISIT TO A CATSKILLS BLACK BEAR DEN: KERHONKSON, N.Y. – Checking inside a winter bear den in the dead of winter has its challenges and pleasant surprises.

That became clear recently when Matt Merchant, a senior wildlife biologist at the state Department of Environmental Conservation’s Region 3 office in New Paltz led a contingent of DEC staffers and others at Minnewaska State Park to check one out.

                                          David Figura l NYup.com

(To view video of visit go to https://www.syracuse.com/expo/life-and-culture/g66l-2019/02/b2cfbd43b6a64/an-eyeopening-visit-to-a-catskills-black-bear-den-video.html?ath=2720251fd1c58d8b12c9b47e4d8cfbf9&utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Newsletter%20-%20Outdoors&utm_campaign=Newsletter:%20Single%20Blog%20-%20Outdoors#cmpid=nsltr_strycardrightbutton_single)

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

JANUARY 2019

2-3/15 – Capt. Bob’s Outdoors Winter Fishing Derby (Entry fee is $20) 8 species divisions. (For information call 716-407-3021)

 

MARCH 2019

1 - Start of Fishing Ban (No Fishing) on North McMillan Creek and Conesus Inlet WMA from Conesus Lake South to the Dam (Livingston County) except the canal west of the inlet and that portion of the north of the canal. (>5/4)

1 - Start of Canada Goose Hunting Season – Part 4 – in the South Zone (3/10/19)

1 - National Wild Turkey Federation – The Forest Kings Chapter Dinner at Sean Patrick’s “Emerald Isle”, 3480 Millersport Highway, Amherst, NY. (6:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Sam Troup  716-631-3500)

1-31 - Celebrate Owasco Lake Month at the Finger Lakes Museum & Aquarium, 3369 Guyanoga Road, Branchport, NY. The Museum focuses attention on the lake, home to both cold water & warm water fisheries!  (Free) (For information email mail@fingerlakesmuseum.org.)

7-10 - WNY Sport & Travel Expo at the Erie County Fairgrounds Event Center, 5820 South Park Avenue, Hamburg, NY. (Thu & Fri Noon-9:00pm/Sat 10:00 am – 8:00 pm/Sun 11:00 am – 5:00 pm) WNY Sport & Travel Expo will be dedicated to the outdoor enthusiast. Special guests include Greg Miller from the hit show In Pursuit Bwana Jim and his Wildlife Show, Jim Beverly Retriever Training, and Clint Taylor. WNY Sport & Travel Expo will showcase excellent entertainment and seminars on hunting, fishing and other outdoor activities for all age group. There will be very large display of goods and services related to sport and travel. Interactive games will make it more entertaining for the participants. (Cost: $9.00/Children 10 and under free/Scouts in uniform free/Free Parking) (For information go to http://10times.com/wny-sport-travel)

8 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Lake Ridge Gobbler Chapter Dinner at the Brockport Elks Club #2100, 4400 Sweden Walker Road, Brockport, NY. (6:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Vickie Sweet 585-739-6976 vsweet1@rochester.rr.com)

9 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Cortland Limbhangers Chapter Dinner at the Cortland County Music Park, 1824 State Route 13, Cortland, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Bret Eccleston  607-842-6260   rollingridges@frontiernet.net)

9 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Letchworth Chapter Dinner at the J W Jones Hall, 54 Leicester Rd. (Route 36), Caledonia, NY. The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.   (For more information contact David Fanaro   585-202-6794  lakeviewconstruction@hotmail.com)

9 - Whitetails Unlimited Western New York Deer Camp at the Carousel Banquet Facility Hamburg Fairgrounds, 5600 McKinley Parkway, Hamburg, NY. The deadline ticket date is March 3, 2019. Tickets may be ordered online at www.whitetailsunlimited.com or by phone - 1-800-274-5471. (Cost $45.00/$30.00 youth.) Everyone goes home with a Deer Camp Tour 2017 Shirt! (For information contact Bill Bailey at 413-244-2304 between 8:00 am and 6:00 pm)

9 - Northern Chautauqua Co. (Dunkirk) Ducks Unlimited Dinner at the Blessed Mary Angela Parish Social Hall, 324 Townsend Street, Dunkirk, New York, (5:00 – 9:30 pm) (Cost: Single $45/Couple $75/after 2/28 - $50 and $75) (For information call Ron Romance 716 - 969 – 5166)

9 - Boy Scout Bird Study Merit Badge at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (12:00 – 3:00 pm) Boy Scouts are invited to complete the requirements for the Bird Study Merit Badge during fun and interactive activities. Please be prepared to go outside and dress for the weather. Pre-requisites are required.  All Scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone. Fee: $8/Scout. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

9-10 - Niagara Frontier – Cheektowaga Gun Show at the Knights of Columbus, 2735 Union Road,
Cheektowaga, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am - 3:00pm) 90 tables. NICS background checks available. (Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call Bruce Johnston 716-542-9929 or email nfgshows@aol.com)

9-10 - The Fly Fishing Show at the Lancaster County Convention Center, 3 East Vine Street, Lancaster, PA (Sat 9:00 am – 5:30 pm/Sun 9:00 am – 4:30 pm) Fly Fishers International (FFI) is pleased to offer FREE fly fishing instruction at the Learning Center located on the main show floor.  Basic fly-casting, fly-tying, and knots, will be taught throughout the day-every day of the Fly Fishing Show. (Cost: Adult 1-day $15.00; 2 day $25.00/Children 5 and under Free; 6 – 12 $5.00/Scouts under 16 in uniform Free/Military with ID $10.00) (For information go to https://flyfishingshow.com/lancaster-pa/)

10 - Close of Canada Goose Hunting Season – Part 4 – in the South Zone

10 - Tioga County Trappers Association Fur Sale at the Tioga County Sportsman's Association, 1141 Carmichael Road, Owego, NY.  (9:00 am to 12:00 pm.) (For information contact Bill Swagler at 607-222-8554 or Mike Verry 607-427-5589.) 

10 – 5th Annual Genesee Charter Boat Association Fishing Flea Market at the  Pt. Pleasant Fire Hall, 55 Ewer Avenue, Rochester, NY (9:00 am – 2:00 pm) No Admission. Come on down and haggle with the captains and get some great deals, or pick their brains for some tips on being successful on the big lake. Some proceeds go to the pen rearing project and the fire department. (For information go to GCBA Flyer 2019.docx)

11 - Cayuga Bird Club Presentation - Borneo: a Birding Tour of Sabah, Malaysia by Susan Danskin, Diane Morton and Ken Kemphues at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology Auditorium, 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, NY. (7:30 – 9:00 pm) Borneo’s unique geography makes it home to a high number of bird species found nowhere else in the world, plus an amazing diversity of plants, insects, and mammals. Our speakers traveled to the highlands of Mount Kinabalu, lowland rainforest jungles, and coastal wetlands, seeing hundreds of birds, including all eight species of Borneo’s Hornbills, edible-nest swifts in a large cave, trogons, sunbirds, spiderhunters, blue flycatchers, and the world’s largest flower. Bornean Orangutans, Proboscis Monkeys, Pygmy Elephants, and Red Giant Flying Squirrels were among the many mammals encountered along the way. The diversity of life in the protected forests they visited was truly remarkable; however, much of Borneo’s forested area is threatened by rapid expansion of palm oil plantations. Diane Morton is president, Ken Kemphues the current treasurer, and Susan Danskin past-treasurer of the Cayuga Bird Club. All three are avid birders; their trip to Borneo was for each their first time birding in Asia. Club business begins at 7:30 p.m. with the presentation to follow. Everyone is welcome! (For information call 800-843-2473 or email lms9@cornell.edu.)

14 - Annual State of Lake Ontario Public Meeting at the SUNY Schenectady County Community College, Stockade Building, Room 101, 78 Washington Avenue, Schenectady, NY (Schenectady County). (6:30 – 9:00 pm) The meeting is co-hosted by the Eastern Lake Ontario Salmon and Trout Association. DEC, United States Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources biologists will make a number of presentations, including updates on the status of trout and salmon fisheries, forage fish, stocking programs, and fisheries management plans. Ample time will be provided at the end of the scheduled program for the audience to interact with the presenters. Information summaries for a host of Lake Ontario fisheries assessment programs will be posted at: http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/27068.html prior to the public meetings. (For information contact Christopher Legard, Cape Vincent Fisheries Research Station 315-654-2147)

14 - Educator Workshop: Plt Environmental Experiences For Early Childhood at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (4:00 7:00 pm) Search Learn how to engage young children in outdoor exploration! Attendees receive an interdisciplinary activity guide and music CD. 3 CTLE hours provided. For educators of children ages 3 to 6.  (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

15 - Deadline for removing Ice Shanties from all waters.

15 - Close of Statewide Fishing Seasons for Northern Pike, Pickerel, Tiger Muskellunge and Walleye

15 - Close of Fishing Season for Muskellunge in the Susquehanna River (Tioga County) & the Chemung River and Tributaries (Chemung County)

15 - Close of Finger Lakes Bass Season.

15 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Canisteo Valley Chapter Dinner at The Main Place, Main Streeet, Hornell, NY (6:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Matthew Wilhelm 585-808-9362) 

15-16 - NYDU State Convention and Conservation Celebration at the Ramada Inn Lakefront, Geneva, New York. A celebration of the achievements during 2018.  (Cost: Single (full weekend) $165/Couple (full weekend) $290/Greenwing (full weekend) $50.00/Adult (Fri only) $75/Adult Sat only) $90) (For information go to www.ducks.org/new-york/events)

16 - Start of Catch and Release (Artificial Lures Only) Season for Black Bass in all Finger Lakes except Cayuga, Otisco, Owasco and Skaneateles Lakes. (>6/19/16)

16 - Fishing Ban (No Fishing) on Otselic River from mouth to Whitney Point Reservoir Dam, Susquehanna River in Binghamton between Rock Bottom Dam and Exchange Street Bridge, Susquehanna River in the towns of Union and Vestal from the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad bridge downstream to Murphy's Island, Tioughnioga River from New York Route 26 bridge to US Route 11 bridge, Little Choconut Creek from mouth to Goudey Station Building (Broome County), Dutch Hollow Brook from Owasco Lake upstream to the Route 38A bridge (Cayuga County), Scriba Creek from mouth upstream to Fish Hatchery Dam (Oswego County) (>5/4)

16 – Eastren Lake Ontario Salmon & Trout Association Annual Flea Market at the Brewerton, NY Fire Hall. (For information call 315-515-8278)

16 - Crown City Bassmasters  Hunting & Fishing Extravaganza at the Dryden Fire Station, Dryden, NY. (9:00 am – 2:00 pm) For more info call Joe Matt, 315-420-8150.

16 - Southwestern NY Friends of NRA Banquet at the Seneca Allegany Resort & Casino, 777 Seneca Allegany Blvd., Salamanca, NY (4:30 pm) (Cost: $50.00) (For information contact Ray Patchkofsky 585-307-9824 or email  raymondpatchkofsky@yahoo.com)

16 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Finger Lakes Bucks N’ Beards Chapter Dinner at J B's Bar & Grill, 10832 Gloades Corners Road, Prattsburgh, NY. (5:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Steve Calderwood 607-522-7991  eot_tradingpost.yahoo.com) 

16 - Chemung County Coon Hunters Association Inc Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Rumsey Hill Road, Van Etten, NY. (3:00 pm – Coonhound Event Field Trial-Poor Boy - $12.00/5:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Poor Boy – $12.00/7:00pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $12.00) (For information call Larry Morley at 607-387-9803)

16 - Wine and Wings Raptor Van Tour meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (1:00 – 4:00 pm) The spring migration is here so join us to search for migratory waterfowl, elusive Northern Harriers, breeding Bald Eagles and more! During the tour, we will stop at Izzo’s White Barn Winery and enjoy award-winning wines and learn how vineyards and Important Birds Areas can exist side by side. Fee: $20/adult, includes wine tastings. Must be 21+. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

16-17 - The 72 Annual Batavia Gun and Sportsman Show at the Quality Inn & Suites, 8250 Park Road, Batavia, NY (Sat-9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun-9:00 am – 3:00 pm) This show is hosted by the Alabama Hunt Club. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. 150+ tables. (Cost: $5.00/under 12 free w/adult) (For information contact Denis Davis  585-798-6089  dwdavis70@gmail.com)

17 - Genesee Valley Trappers Association Fur Auction at the Clubhouse, 4462 County Road 32 (3 miles east of Honeoye, south of 20A), Honeoye, NY (6:30 am fur checkin/10:00 am auction) ($10.00 charge for non-members) (For information call Tom Miller, 585-229-4759)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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3 - 1 – 19

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

"STATE OF LAKE ONTARIO" MEETINGS: The public will have the opportunity to learn about the State of Lake Ontario fisheries at public meetings to be held in Niagara, Monroe, Oswego and Schenectady counties in March.

New York's Lake Ontario waters comprise more than 2.7 million acres. The open lake, embayments, and tributaries support thriving populations of sportfish, including trout, salmon, bass, walleye, yellow perch, and panfish. A recent statewide angler survey estimated more than 2.6 million angler days were spent on Lake Ontario and major tributaries, resulting in an estimated economic value of $112 million annually to local communities.

Staff from DEC and the United States Geological Survey will make a number of presentations, including updates on the status of trout and salmon fisheries in the lake and its tributaries, forage fish, and stocking programs. The meetings will provide ample time at the end of the scheduled program for the audience to ask questions and interact with the presenters Information about DEC's Lake Ontario fisheries assessment programs can be found on DEC's website.

Meeting dates and locations are:

Monday, March 4: 6:30 - 9 p.m. at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) campus (Chester F Carlson Center for Imaging Science), Rochester, Monroe County. The meeting is co-hosted by RIT and the Monroe County Fishery Advisory Board.

Thursday, March 7: 6:30 - 9 p.m. at the Cornell Cooperative Extension Building, 4487 Lake Ave., Lockport, Niagara County. The meeting is co-hosted by Niagara County Cooperative Extension and the Niagara County Sportfishery Development Board.

Thursday, March 14: 6:30 - 9 p.m. at SUNY Schenectady County Community College, Stockade Building, Room 101, 78 Washington Ave., Schenectady, Schenectady County.

Tuesday, March 19: 6:30 - 9 p.m. at the Pulaski High School auditorium, 4624 Salina St., Pulaski, Oswego County The meeting is co-hosted by the Eastern Lake Ontario Salmon and Trout Association.

For further information contact Christopher Legard, NYSDEC Lake Ontario Unit Leader at the Cape Vincent Fisheries Research Station, (315) 654-2147.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Bear Cub Rescue - Ulster County: On February 3rd, Environmental Conservation Officer (ECO) Adam Johnson received a call from a concerned resident about a bear cub in a tree close to a local highway in Shandaken. DEC biologists had been attempting to capture a bear cub in that area. When ECO Johnson arrived, he saw the bear cub sitting in front of the trap entrance, contemplating if it wanted to follow the treats inside. Finally, the bear cub entered the trap, triggering the door release.

With the bear successfully trapped, ECO Johnson brought the cub to a wildlife rehabilitator qualified to care for young bears. The small bear was severely dehydrated and malnourished, weighing approximately 10 pounds Bear cubs this time of year should be close to 50 pounds and hibernating in dens. This bear's survival is even more impressive considering that temperatures in the area were well below freezing for weeks prior to its capture.

Wilderness Rescue: Town of Italy, Yates County: On Feb. 23, two men from the town of Greece were participating in geocaching activities on High Tor Wildlife Management Area (WMA) when one of the men lost his footing, slid into Clark's Gully, and was unable to get himself out due to icy conditions. They called 911 and DEC Forest Rangers, Yates County Sheriff's Deputies, Naples Fire Department and Ambulance, and the Ontario County High Angle Rope Rescue Team responded. Historically, the location requires a technical rope rescue to extricate people who have fallen into the gully and this incident was no different. Rescuers set up a rope and safety system that would allow rescuers to lead the man out of an area close to a frozen waterfall. Within a few hours, all were safely out of the area, and neither hikers nor rescuers required any medical treatment.

Barn Fire - Seneca County: On Feb. 15, ECO Tim Brown was on patrol in the town of Fayette when he responded to a structure fire at a nearby farm. ECO Brown and Seneca County Sheriff's Deputy Zach Nelson arrived at the scene within minutes of the call and began helping the son of the property owner evacuate livestock from an adjacent barn close to the fire. By the time the livestock had been evacuated, firefighters from several local departments began to arrive on scene. The firefighters coordinated efforts over several hours to battle the blaze, which destroyed one barn and several pieces of farm machinery but resulted in no injuries to first responders or livestock. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

Lighting Up the Night - Monroe County: In the early morning hours on Feb. 16, ECO Spencer Noyes observed a wide red spotlight scanning the fields and emanating from a pickup truck slowly driving on a rural road in the town of Hamlin. Noyes had recently received complaints of spotlighting and people shooting from the road in the area. Noyes followed the truck and pulled it over after the driver failed to stop at a stop sign. Inside the truck the ECO found five unsecured rifles, three spotlights, and multiple sets of shooting sticks. The driver admitted that he and his passenger were spotlighting to hunt coyotes from the truck ECO Noyes issued multiple tickets for possessing an unsecured firearm while spotlighting and hunting with the aid of a motor vehicle. The charges are returnable to Town of Hamlin Court in March.

 

2019-2020 DUCK SEASON DATES  ANNOUNCED: DEC selected the duck season dates by implementing a process that maximizes duck hunter inclusion, is rooted in scientific data, and balances factors in duck abundance and specific zones of the state. These waterfowl hunting seasons are the results of a two-year collaboration between DEC's Bureau of Wildlife and Cornell University. DEC asked a group of waterfowl hunters, known as the Waterfowl Task Force, to identify options for optimal duck season dates in each waterfowl zone. DEC and Cornell University's Center for Conservation Social Sciences then surveyed approximately one-third of the duck hunters in New York State (roughly 6,000 hunters). Finally, biologists incorporated the most recent zone-specific duck abundance and migration data.

In all waterfowl zones, hunters felt the most important consideration was the opportunity to pursue mallards and black ducks, followed closely by the opportunity to pursue any duck or a diversity of species. Duck hunters like to see a variety of duck species when they hunt. DEC paired this information with new, zone-specific data on duck abundance and migration. Through this process, DEC identified season dates that best fit the values of duck hunters in each zone.

Barring changes to season length, duck seasons in New York will be open for the following dates in 2019-2020:

Western Zone - Beginning the third Saturday in October, running 23 days, ending on a Sunday; a second split beginning on the last Saturday in November, running 37 days, and ending on a Sunday (e.g., Oct 19, 2019 - Nov. 10, 2019 and Nov. 30, 2019 - Jan. 5, 2020). Western Zone Structured Decision-Making Analysis and Results

Northeastern Zone - Beginning on the first Saturday in October, running for 23 days, ending on a Sunday, and a second split beginning the first Saturday following the closure of the 1st split, running 37 days, and ending on a Sunday (e.g., Oct. 5, 2019 - Oct. 27, 2019 and Nov. 2, 2019 - Dec. 8, 2019). Northeastern Zone Structured Decision-Making Analysis and Results

Southeastern Zone - Beginning the third Saturday in October, running for 44 days, ending on a Sunday, and a second split beginning the first Saturday following the closure of the 1st split, running 16 days, and ending on a Sunday (e.g., Oct. 19, 2019 - Dec. 1, 2019 and Dec. 7, 2019 - Dec. 22, 2019). Southeastern Zone Structured Decision-Making Analysis and Results

Long Island Zone - Beginning on the Saturday prior to Thanksgiving, running for 9 days, ending on a Sunday, and a second split running for 51 days, opening on a Saturday, and ending on the last Sunday in January (e.g., Nov. 23, 2019 - Dec. 1, 2019 and Dec. 7, 2019 - Jan. 26, 2020). Long Island Zone Structured Decision-Making Analysis and Results

DEC will announce tentative bag limits for all migratory game birds in early April. Also, season dates for the next four years (through 2024) will be based on this study and structure.

A description of waterfowl hunting zones and boundaries can be found on DEC's website.

More detailed information on the duck hunter survey and the season selection process can be found on the DEC website.

 

FALCONRY, WILDLIFE REHABILITATOR AND LEASHED TRACKING DOG EXAMINATIONS: Examinations for individuals seeking a license to practice the sport of falconry, become a volunteer wildlife rehabilitator, or use leashed tracking dogs to find wounded or injured big game animals are scheduled for Friday, April 12, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced today.

The exams are scheduled for 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at most DEC Regional Offices across the state. A list of DEC Regional Offices can be found on DEC's website. The deadline for registering to take these free exams is Friday, March 22, and exam registration forms can be found on DEC's website.

Apprentice Falconry License

Falconry has a rich history and tradition throughout the world and requires a significant commitment in time and effort. Apprentices are limited to possessing one bird, either an American kestrel or a red-tailed hawk A falconry study guide and examination manual are available at no cost from DEC's website. The cost of a five-year falconry license is $40.

To qualify for the Apprentice Falconry license, applicants must:

score 80 percent or higher on the written exam;

be at least 14 years of age;

possess a valid New York State hunting license; and

maintain DEC-approved facilities for housing falconry raptors.

Wildlife Rehabilitator License

Wildlife rehabilitators provide for the care of injured, sick and orphaned wild animals for the purpose of returning rehabilitated animals to the wild. Prospective applicants are encouraged to gain experience by serving as an assistant to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator. A wildlife rehabilitator study guide and examination manual are available at no cost from DEC's website. There is no cost for the license, which is good for five years.

To qualify for the Wildlife Rehabilitator License, applicants must:

score 80 percent or higher on the written exam;

be at least 16 years of age; and

be interviewed by DEC Regional wildlife staff.

Leashed Tracking Dog Handler

Leashed tracking dog handlers use their dogs to track and recover dead, wounded or injured big game. Leashed tracking dog handlers provide a valuable service in aiding hunters in locating wounded big game that otherwise may go unrecovered. A leashed tracking dog study guide is available at no cost from DEC's website. There is a $50 license fee for the five-year license and a $25 non-refundable application fee.

To qualify for a Leashed Tracking Dog Handler License, applicants must:

score 80 percent or higher on the written exam; and

possess a valid New York State hunting license.

To apply for any of these exams, visit the DEC Special Licenses Unit website and complete an exam registration form. Applicants can mail, fax, or email the completed form to: NYS DEC Special Licenses Unit, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-4752 Phone: 518-402-8985, Fax: 518-402-8925, Email: SpecialLicenses@dec.ny.gov.

 

BUYING HELPS FISH AND WILDLIFE: Most people don’t realize that when they buy fishing gear, they are directly helping the fish they love to catch. It is all thanks to a law passed in 1950 called the Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Act (named after the congressmen who spearheaded the effort). This law created an excise tax on fishing tackle, equipment, boat fuel, and other items. Most consumers aren’t even aware that this tax exists because it is paid by the manufacturer. Every time eligible equipment is sold, the tax is applied. Federal agencies collect the tax and direct it to a special fund that is distributed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) through the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program. A requirement of the DJ Act essentially says that for a state to receive funds, all money generated from the sale of licenses must only be used to support the functions of that agency and cannot be used for other purposes. 

In addition to the DJ Act there is also an important fund created to benefit wildlife species. The Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act was the model for the DJ Act and was enacted in 1937.  The revenue for this funding source comes from a tax applied to the sale of firearms and ammunition. Wildlife resources benefit from this tax in the very same way fisheries populations benefit from the DJ Act.

(https://www.thefishingwire.com/features/83c3687a-473d-4727-966e-d43805b0ae82)

 

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

JANUARY 2019

2-3/15 – Capt. Bob’s Outdoors Winter Fishing Derby (Entry fee is $20) 8 species divisions. (For information call 716-407-3021)

 

MARCH 2019

1 - Start of Fishing Ban (No Fishing) on North McMillan Creek and Conesus Inlet WMA from Conesus Lake South to the Dam (Livingston County) except the canal west of the inlet and that portion of the north of the canal. (>5/4)

1 - Start of Canada Goose Hunting Season – Part 4 – in the South Zone (3/10/19)

1 - National Wild Turkey Federation – The Forest Kings Chapter Dinner at Sean Patrick’s “Emerald Isle”, 3480 Millersport Highway, Amherst, NY. (6:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Sam Troup  716-631-3500)

1-31 - Celebrate Owasco Lake Month at the Finger Lakes Museum & Aquarium, 3369 Guyanoga Road, Branchport, NY. The Museum focuses attention on the lake, home to both cold water & warm water fisheries!  (Free) (For information email mail@fingerlakesmuseum.org.)

2 - The Annual Roger Tobey Memorial Steelhead Contest (Rescheduled Date). If you want to find out more information, call Paul Jackson at 716-731-4780) sponsored by the Niagara River Anglers Association (Sunrise – 2:00 pm) Tournament boundaries include Lake Ontario and its tributaries, as well as the Lower Niagara River. Fish can be caught from boat or shore. Sign up at Creek Road Bait and Tackle, Lewiston, the Slippery Sinker in Olcott or at the launch ramp in Lewiston the morning of the contest. Awards ceremony and after party will be held at Lewiston No. 1 Fire Hall, 145-6th Street, Lewiston starting at 3 p.m. Cost is $20 for entry plus $20 for NRAA membership. An optional $5 cost is available for anyone looking to compete for the biggest brown trout. For more information check out www.niagarariveranglers.com or call Paul Jackson at 731-4780. Entry forms should also be available at Creek Road Bait and Tackle in Lewiston and The Slippery Sinker in Olcott. 

2 - Annual Antique Fishing Tackle Ice Breaker Show at the Elk’s Lodge, 6791 North Canal Road, Lockport, NY (10:30 am to 2:00 pm) Old fishing tackle will be the focus of the 30th annual Show. You are encouraged to bring any old fishing tackle to help determine if it has value. (Cost: Adults $5.00/ Spouses and kids under 16 are free.) (For information call 716-713-9410)     

2 – Ice Masters Elite Tournament Trail – Silver Lake-State Boat Launch (Points). Prizes: total weight of 6 panfish (perch, bluegill and/or crappie), largest northern pike and lunker fish. (For information call 607) 742-0343)

2 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Southern Tier Local Chapter Dinner at the Owego Treadway, Route 17C, Owego, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Andrew Munson  607-722-0572  amunson@stny.rr.com) 

2 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Lake Country Chapter Dinner at the Clifton Kings Catering, 4031 Routes 5&20, Canandaigua, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Michael Marvin 585-738-8031)

2 - Bird Dissection & Discussion Workshop at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (12:00 – 3:00 pm) Join us for a bird dissection and discussion to learn about the interesting differences and similarities between various species. If you have ever wanted to examine birds up close and personal, this is your chance. There will be opportunity for attendees to explore the internal and external anatomy of their own study bird if they wish, and to dissect the bird. All children must be accompanied by a parent. Fee: $10/child; $15/adult, $40/family. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

2 – Owl Ecology at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am) Search for signs of owls in the woods after an indoor introduction to these birds of prey. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

2-3 - Niagara Frontier – Springville Gun Show at the Springville Vol. Fire Hall, 405 Main St, Springville, NY (9:00 am – 4:00 pm/9:00 am - 3:00pm) 65 tables. NICS background checks available. (Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call Bruce Johnston 716-542-9929 or email nfgshows@aol.com)

2-3 - Catteraugus County Sportsman Show at Seneca Allegany Event Center, 777 Seneca Allegany Blvd., Salamanca, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 5:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am – 3:00 pm) Hosted by York-Penn Shows of New York. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. 400 tables. (Cost: $8.00) (For information call James Buck at 716-569-6810 or email topdrake@yahoo.com)

4 - Annual State of Lake Ontario Public Meeting at the Carlson Auditorium, in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science building (76-1125) on the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) Campus, Jefferson Road, Henrietta, NY (Monroe County). (6:30 – 9:00 pm) The meeting is co-hosted by RIT and the Monroe County Fishery Advisory Board. DEC, United States Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources biologists will make a number of presentations, including updates on the status of trout and salmon fisheries, forage fish, stocking programs, and fisheries management plans. Ample time will be provided at the end of the scheduled program for the audience to interact with the presenters. Information summaries for a host of Lake Ontario fisheries assessment programs will be posted at: http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/27068.html prior to the public meetings. (For information contact Christopher Legard, Cape Vincent Fisheries Research Station 315-654-2147)

7 -  Annual State of Lake Ontario Public Meeting at the Cornell Cooperative Extension Building, 4487 Lake Avenue, Lockport, NY (Niagara County). (6:30 – 9:00 pm) The meeting is co-hosted by Niagara County Cooperative Extension and the Niagara County Sportfishery Development Board.DEC, United States Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources biologists will make a number of presentations, including updates on the status of trout and salmon fisheries, forage fish, stocking programs, and fisheries management plans. Ample time will be provided at the end of the scheduled program for the audience to interact with the presenters. Information summaries for a host of Lake Ontario fisheries assessment programs will be posted at: http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/27068.html prior to the public meetings. (For information contact Christopher Legard, Cape Vincent Fisheries Research Station 315-654-2147)

7 - National Wild Turkey Federation – The Forest Kings Chapter Dinner at Sean Patrick’s “Emerald Isle”, 3480 Millersport Highway, Amherst, NY. (6:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Sam Troup 716-631-3500)

7 - Winter Raptor Birding Van Tour meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (1:00 – 4:00 pm) The Finger Lakes Region is home to many migratory raptors, including Short-eared Owls, Gyrfalcons, Snowy Owls, Rough-legged Hawks, and Norther Harriers. Join us for a trip around the Finger Lakes Regional Airport and nearby grasslands to search for these visitors from the Great White North. Binoculars and bird guides will be provided. Fee: $8/child; $15/adult. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

7-10 - WNY Sport & Travel Expo at the Erie County Fairgrounds Event Center, 5820 South Park Avenue, Hamburg, NY. (Thu & Fri Noon-9:00pm/Sat 10:00 am – 8:00 pm/Sun 11:00 am – 5:00 pm) WNY Sport & Travel Expo will be dedicated to the outdoor enthusiast. Special guests include Greg Miller from the hit show In Pursuit Bwana Jim and his Wildlife Show, Jim Beverly Retriever Training, and Clint Taylor. WNY Sport & Travel Expo will showcase excellent entertainment and seminars on hunting, fishing and other outdoor activities for all age group. There will be very large display of goods and services related to sport and travel. Interactive games will make it more entertaining for the participants. (Cost: $9.00/Children 10 and under free/Scouts in uniform free/Free Parking) (For information go to http://10times.com/wny-sport-travel)

8 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Lake Ridge Gobbler Chapter Dinner at the Brockport Elks Club #2100, 4400 Sweden Walker Road, Brockport, NY. (6:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Vickie Sweet 585-739-6976 vsweet1@rochester.rr.com)

9 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Cortland Limbhangers Chapter Dinner at the Cortland County Music Park, 1824 State Route 13, Cortland, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Bret Eccleston  607-842-6260   rollingridges@frontiernet.net)

9 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Letchworth Chapter Dinner at the J W Jones Hall, 54 Leicester Rd. (Route 36), Caledonia, NY. The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.   (For more information contact David Fanaro   585-202-6794  lakeviewconstruction@hotmail.com)

9 - Whitetails Unlimited Western New York Deer Camp at the Carousel Banquet Facility Hamburg Fairgrounds, 5600 McKinley Parkway, Hamburg, NY. The deadline ticket date is March 3, 2019. Tickets may be ordered online at www.whitetailsunlimited.com or by phone - 1-800-274-5471. (Cost $45.00/$30.00 youth.) Everyone goes home with a Deer Camp Tour 2017 Shirt! (For information contact Bill Bailey at 413-244-2304 between 8:00 am and 6:00 pm)

9 - Northern Chautauqua Co. (Dunkirk) Ducks Unlimited Dinner at the Blessed Mary Angela Parish Social Hall, 324 Townsend Street, Dunkirk, New York, (5:00 – 9:30 pm) (Cost: Single $45/Couple $75/after 2/28 - $50 and $75) (For information call Ron Romance 716 - 969 – 5166)

9 - Boy Scout Bird Study Merit Badge at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (12:00 – 3:00 pm) Boy Scouts are invited to complete the requirements for the Bird Study Merit Badge during fun and interactive activities. Please be prepared to go outside and dress for the weather. Pre-requisites are required.  All Scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone. Fee: $8/Scout. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

9-10 - Niagara Frontier – Cheektowaga Gun Show at the Knights of Columbus, 2735 Union Road,
Cheektowaga, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am - 3:00pm) 90 tables. NICS background checks available. (Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call Bruce Johnston 716-542-9929 or email nfgshows@aol.com)

9-10 - The Fly Fishing Show at the Lancaster County Convention Center, 3 East Vine Street, Lancaster, PA (Sat 9:00 am – 5:30 pm/Sun 9:00 am – 4:30 pm) Fly Fishers International (FFI) is pleased to offer FREE fly fishing instruction at the Learning Center located on the main show floor.  Basic fly-casting, fly-tying, and knots, will be taught throughout the day-every day of the Fly Fishing Show. (Cost: Adult 1-day $15.00; 2 day $25.00/Children 5 and under Free; 6 – 12 $5.00/Scouts under 16 in uniform Free/Military with ID $10.00) (For information go to https://flyfishingshow.com/lancaster-pa/)

10 - Close of Canada Goose Hunting Season – Part 4 – in the South Zone

10 - Tioga County Trappers Association Fur Sale at the Tioga County Sportsman's Association, 1141 Carmichael Road, Owego, NY.  (9:00 am to 12:00 pm.) (For information contact Bill Swagler at 607-222-8554 or Mike Verry 607-427-5589.) 

10 – 5th Annual Genesee Charter Boat Association Fishing Flea Market at the  Pt. Pleasant Fire Hall, 55 Ewer Avenue, Rochester, NY (9:00 am – 2:00 pm) No Admission. Come on down and haggle with the captains and get some great deals, or pick their brains for some tips on being successful on the big lake. Some proceeds go to the pen rearing project and the fire department. (For information go to GCBA Flyer 2019.docx)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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2 - 22 – 19

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

BLUE-EYED COYOTES: Researchers say an animal like this could be as rare as one in a million. Coyotes aren't rare--not anymore, at least. As remarkably efficient predators, coyotes have solidified their place atop North America's ecosystem, sustaining consistent population growth year after year.

As common as America's most common wild canines have become, though, they don't often differ much in the way of looks. They're largely indistinguishable, varying little in size, coloration or overall complexion.

However, back in June 2018, National Geographic reported the sighting of a coyote with blue eyes at Point Reyes National Seashore in northern California.